The Latest News From the Yorkshire Geological Society

Please find below recent society news and information directly from the YGS Facebook page. If you would like to join in with any discussions about the geology of Yorkshire, or share any interesting photographs you may have, please feel free to post a message on our Facebook page.

The Society also operates a member’s email list to help keep members informed of Society news and changes to the events programme. The system is administered through the national Joint Academic Computer Network (JICSMAIL) on behalf of the Society, and allows both Council and registered members to communicate directly.

If you would like to receive news and updates directly via e-mail, please contact us and request to be added to our members e-mail forum.

  • Posted 1 Day Ago By Yorkshire Geological Society

    Yorkshire Geological Society
    Check out all BGS publications, memoirs and regional guides, latest and historic editions, all available to view online. Go to the link below, and select 'Publication Viewer'. Happy reading! http://www.bgs.ac.uk...ublications.html
  • Posted 3 Weeks Ago By Yorkshire Geological Society

    Yorkshire Geological Society
    Fearnsides Award 2016: Presented to Dr Lucy Campbell  In 2016 the Yorkshire Geological Society’s long-standing Fearnsides Prize was reorganised by the Council as a research award. In introducing the first recipient, Dr Lucy Campbell, the President, Dr Andy Howard, said:  Lucy graduated with a First in Geology from Edinburgh University and then went on to study for an MSc in Structural Geology and Geophysics at Leeds University. She then completed her PhD project entitled “Constraining the parameters of deformation recorded in fault-generated pseudotachylytes” there in 2016, following research supervised by Dr. Geoffrey Lloyd in the School of Earth and Environment at the University of Leeds. Lucy plans to extend the work covered in her PhD thesis, developing the links she has made with Professor Eric Ferré of Southern Illinois University and the application of advanced techniques, to analyse fault slip directions and identify patterns of flow preserved in pseudotachylyte veins. Lucy is now a post-doctoral research fellow in ‘Structural geology and rock Deformation’ at the University of Plymouth. On her Twitter ID Lucy describes herself as a ‘hunter of ancient earthquakes’. The Fearnsides Award will be used towards funding a period of fieldwork in the Western Isles of Scotland, the preparation of thin sections of collected samples and a visit in 2017 to the laboratory of the University of Southern Illinois where samples will be analysed using the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) technique.
  • Posted 3 Weeks Ago By Yorkshire Geological Society

    Yorkshire Geological Society
    President’s Word, April 2017  In my very first President’s Word I talked about the critical role that societies like the YGS can play in communicating the importance and relevance of geology. Each Spring, Yorkshire Geology Day and Yorkshire Geology Month demonstrate the power of the collective efforts of volunteers, societies and charities all over the north of England to inform and enthuse the public on the wonders of our rocks and landscape.  We are delighted again this year to work with our partner societies and individuals (see the programme above), and our hosts the National Coal Mining Museum for England, to organize a full day of displays, underground trips, walks and lectures at Caphouse that are free of charge to the public. Our theme for the afternoon lecture programme, ‘Geology and your Shopping Basket’, will round off the day by demonstrating how geologically-sourced materials, some from the north of England, are critical for consumer products, food production and new technologies.   Our last meeting on 4 March presented some of the great work of ‘Leading Yorkshire Figures in the History of Geology’. Many members have commented on how much they enjoyed the afternoon and I should like to congratulate our 4 speakers Colin Speakman, Pete Rawson, Tony Cooper and Stuart Ogilvy on their expertly researched and entertaining presentations. It’s extremely rewarding to be involved in organizing such a successful event, so I thought I would use the second part of my ‘blog’ to remind members of the opportunity to experience a similar ‘legal high’, in the role of Programme Secretary to Council.  Pulling together our indoor meeting and field trips programme, and finding venues, speakers and leaders is very much a joint effort by Council, often in partnership with our corresponding societies and with individual members who are experts on the specific meeting themes. So we are not looking for a Programme Secretary to do ‘all the work’, but we do need a volunteer who can organise and coordinate, and make sure everything goes absolutely to plan for each event. Our programme of events is one of the most important functions of the Society, and the Programme Secretary is therefore one of the most valued and rewarding roles on Council. If you would like to help, please follow the link to Contact Us on the YGS website, and let us know: http://www.yorksgeol...g.uk/contact.php Andrew Howard, President
  • Posted 3 Weeks Ago By Yorkshire Geological Society

    Yorkshire Geological Society
    YORKSHIRE GEOLOGY MONTH  Programme for all Yorkshire Geological Society members and the general public through May 2017  Wednesday 3rd May at 7.30pm. (Title to be announced) a lecture organised by the Geology Group of the York Philosophical Society.
    Café Scientifique, Coney Street, York. For updated information contact: ypsgeology@gmail.com   Saturday 6th May at 1.15pm: Roundhay Park Guided Walk, Leeds (West Yorkshire Geological Trust)
    Organised by Friends of Roundhay Park; meet at the Mansion House Visitor Centre, Postcode: LS9 2JL, NGR. 330383. (approx.. 2.5 miles)  Sunday 7th May at 10.15am. The Yoredale Series and Secrets of Wet Grooves. Leader: Lesley Collins for the Craven and Pendle Geological Society.
    Linked morning and afternoon walks, both starting and finishing at Askrigg village. Walk 1 will focus on Carboniferous stratigraphy and resulting topography including the impressive, but little known, Mill Gill Force. Walk 2 will visit the Ballowfields Nature Reserve and old mine workings. Meet at Askrigg village centre (NGR: SD 948910), by the Church (DL8 3HL). Free parking in small village car park and by the Church. Village shop, 2 cafes and 3 Pubs. Public toilets available at all times in the Village (Temperance) Hall. Please book places by contacting the leader on Lesley@lc2210.plus.com   Sunday 7th May (morning) Cemetery Walk in Hull: Hull Geological Society, . Leader: Mike Horne. Booking is required. Contact the leader on 01482 346784 Thursday 11th May at 7.15pm. Lecture: Imaging Life on Earth: Professor Phil Manning (Manchester University)
    organised by the Leeds Geological Association. Rupert Beckett Lecture Theatre, Michael Sadler Building, Leeds University.   Saturday 13th May from 10am. “Rock and Fossil Roadshow” at the Treasure House, Beverley. Organised by the Hull Geological Society.  Saturday 20th May at 10.30am. “The Lower Cretaceous rocks of Claxby Mine”. Leader: Paul Hildreth, Yorkshire Geological Society.
    This is a two hour geology-focussed event contributing to the Lincolnshire Wolds Walking Festival. It is a short walk over a steep hillside and rough ground above Claxby village to examine rock exposures which provide clues to the changing environmental conditions over a period of about 50 million years during the Early Cretaceous. We shall also consider the making of the Lincolnshire landscape and note the stratigraphic position of the Claxby Ironstone. There are other walks available on the day including an afternoon visit to the Claxby Mine, led by an industrial archaeologist, for which this walk provides the geological background. Meet at the the Viking Centre, Pelham Road, Claxby, Lincolnshire. (Postcode: LN8 3YR).  Sunday 28th May at 10.30am for 10.45am start. Reefs and mineral veins of Castleton, Derbyshire; Leader: Paul Hildreth, Yorkshire Geological Society.
    A circular walk of about 8km past the Treak Cliff Lower Carboniferous reef via the Mam Tor landslip and crossing numerous mineral veins to descend Cave Dale for the return to Castleton. Meet at the car park in front of the entrance to Winnats Pass (NGR: SK 140828). The visit is for the Brigg Geology Group and aimed at the amateur enthusiast and geologists of the future.   Wednesday 31st May at 11am. The geology of the Ingleton Inlier. Leaders: Bill Paley and Paul Hildreth, Yorkshire Geological Society.
    A circular walk following the Ingleton Falls Walk trail to view some of the oldest rocks exposed in Yorkshire. This is a nostalgic trip for the leaders who both mapped the area as undergraduates. The route includes spectacular waterfalls, including Thornton Force, the Craven Faults and a magnificent example of an angular unconformity. Meet in the Falls Walk car park (NGR: SD 693732. Postcode: LA6 3ET). There is a charge for entrance to the Falls Walk. See http://www.ingletonw...o.uk/information for up-to-date price details.
  • Posted 9 Weeks Ago By Yorkshire Geological Society

    Yorkshire Geological Society
    On behalf of Dr Andy Howard, President of YGS, On 3rd January 2017, an earthquake offshore below the southern North Sea was widely reported in the media, especially in Yorkshire and northeast England. The ‘quake had an instrumented magnitude of 3.8, a focus at 18km depth and an epicentre about 150 km east of Scarborough. Models for the decay of ground shaking with distance from the epicentre suggest that such an earthquake would be barely perceptible to people on the east coast of England. Following the media reports, many Yorkshire citizens took to social media to report that they had felt the earthquake, in some cases with some amusingly mocked up ‘damage’ (up-ended wheelie bins and the like). However, notwithstanding the sometimes-questionable scientific value of some social media reportage, earthquakes are one of the earliest and best examples of the objective use of so-called ‘citizen science’ or ‘crowd sourced data’ for research purposes. While the magnitude, foci and epicentres of modern earthquakes are accurately measured by networked arrays of seismometers, human observations remain essential to understand and map the intensity of earthquakes and their effects on people, the environment and infrastructure. The intensity and impact of an earthquake at the Earth’s surface depend on a range of secondary factors, such as the physical properties of the local shallow geology and, the design and quality of the built infrastructure. Seismologists have therefore devised a schema of simple multiple choice questions that encourage the public to report their observations on the effects of earthquakes. The answers are then processed to produce highly valuable scientific data that is used for earthquake research and mitigating seismic risks. In the UK, these data are analysed and mapped using the European Macroseismic Scale, which is also used to evaluate the intensity of historical earthquakes based on eyewitness accounts of the effects on people, objects and buildings, before the advent of modern instrumentation.  The Web and social media are great tools for distributing online questionnaires to acquire information, but long before the days of the internet, seismologists published questionnaires in local and national newspapers, despatched them through the post to local communities close to earthquake epicentres and even had staff or volunteers pounding the streets to drop questionnaires into mailboxes and community centres. But there’s no doubt that modern information technology and the ‘big data’ revolution are encouraging more and more researchers to use ‘crowd-sourcing’ to acquire valuable data for science. There are a few golden rules for good citizen science. First, the observations to be captured must not require any specialist knowledge or learning by the public. Second, the observations must be captured and formatted (for example using a simple questionnaire) so that they can be quickly fed into a scientific database with a minimum of time-consuming translation by the scientists. Third, it’s essential to give citizens feedback on the outcome of the science they are contributing to, which helps to incentivize participation. Finally and most critically, good publicity is needed to get as big a ‘crowd’ as possible to contribute that all-important data.  Again, citizen science is another opportunity for geological societies worldwide to make a major contribution to geoscience, not only through their members’ individual participation but also by helping to publicise citizen science opportunities more widely to the communities they serve. YGS Council will be looking at how the Society can help with this though our website, meetings and events. In the meantime……. ….. did you feel the 3rd January ‘quake, or not? Please help the British Geological Survey at the following link: http://www.earthquak...t_uk_events.html
  • Posted 9 Weeks Ago By Yorkshire Geological Society

    Yorkshire Geological Society
    Pebbly fluvio-deltaic sandstones of the Brimham Grit (Kinderscoutian, Yorkshire, northern England).
    Yorkshire Geological Society's cover photo
  • Posted 12 Weeks Ago By Yorkshire Geological Society

    Yorkshire Geological Society
    THE NORTH ATLANTIC:ORIGIN TO ENERGY Congratulations and thanks to all the speakers (Gillian Foulger, Tony Doré, Christian Schiffer, Randell Stephenson) at our joint meeting yesterday with the North East Geological Society at Durham University. Some fascinating information on new geophysical data, new understanding, and new questions on the opening of the North Atlantic Ocean, and the significance of these geological processes over human timescales - clearly and entertainingly explained. Well done and thanks on behalf of the YGS Members! http://www.yorksgeolsoc.org.uk/
    http://www.negs.org.uk/
    negs
  • Posted 13 Weeks Ago By Yorkshire Geological Society

    Yorkshire Geological Society
    We are also delighted to announce that the Society’s redesigned website has been launched, and can be viewed at the usual web address: http://www.yorksgeolsoc.org.uk/ From the redesigned website you can access information on the Society, gain information upcoming meetings, accessing The Proceedings online, download various Society documents and view a sample photo gallery from past meetings & events.  We value all of your comments, so please let us know what you think of the new website. Hope to see many of you at the first meeting of our 2017 session next Saturday (28th January 2017) at Durham University - further details, including a PDF flyer, can be found at http://www.yorksgeol...ABLE/meeting.pdf
    Welcome to the Yorkshire Geological Society
  • Posted 14 Weeks Ago By Yorkshire Geological Society

    Yorkshire Geological Society
    Some positive news for geology and museums...
    The Yorkshire Museum